Tag Archives: stem

DivyaNag

Join us for #STEMforHer on Twitter to Interview Divya Nag on Monday, 3.24

As part of National Women’s History Month, we’re pleased to take part in an exciting twitter conversation with Divya Nag, Co-Founder of Stem Cell Theranostics and StartX Med.

As STEM continues to heavily influence technological advances and future innovations, the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) and the Small Business Administration (SBA) will facilitate a #STEMforHer twitter chat to highlight the growing interest of women and girls in STEM.

#STEMforHer is an online dialogue aimed at advancing the conversation as it relates to women and girls pursuing careers in STEM. Joining the conversation are prominent women innovators and organizations including: Goldie Blox, Girls in Tech, and one of STEM’s youngest women entrepreneurs– Divya Nag.

Details:

Who: The National Women’s Business Council (@NWBC), Divya Nag (@Dnag09), Goldie Blox (@GoldieBlox), Girls in Tech (@GirlsinTech), and the Small Business Administration (@SBAGov)

How: Twitter hashtag #STEMforHer

When: Monday, 24 March from 2-3pm EST

AP Engineering?

Did you know that plans are in the works to create an AP Engineering curriculum? Though many might be surprised to learn this STEM staple doesn’t already exist, others have been waiting until K-12 schools were ready to implement such a program and colleges were ready to accept the credits. Auditi Chakravarty (vice president for AP curriculum, instruction, and assessment at the College Board) referred to the Next Generation Science Standards as an example of how schools will better integrate engineering-design practices, and explained that an engineering design curriculum will rely not on a single test, but a “valid and reliable” way of assessing a student’s portfolio of work. The proposed components include presenting a problem and identifying its requirements; generating an original solution; constructing and testing a prototype; evaluating and making recommendations; and documenting and presenting a project.

“This is not a test,” said Leigh Abts, a professor of education at the University of Maryland who is a leader in the initiative. “This is people looking at portfolios and awarding some high-stakes performance credit … This is really going to break the mold for how the College Board and others look at student work.”

Organizations involved with the effort to introduce an AP Engineering program include the University of Maryland, the University of Virginia, the College Board, and Project Lead the Way. PLTW already has an engineering curriculum that it uses in schools and it has made its beta “innovation portal” free and available. What do you think? Could you see a program like this being implemented one day for computer science?

Girls in IT: The Facts

Girls in IT: The Facts, sponsored by NCWIT’s K-12 Alliance, is a synthesis of the existing literature on increasing girls’ participation in computing. It aims to bring together this latest research so that readers can gain a clearer and more coherent picture of 1) the current state of affairs for girls in computing, 2) the key barriers to increasing girls’ participation in these fields, and 3) promising practices for addressing these barriers.

Ways to Use Girls in IT: The Facts

  • Get the full PDF report (below)
  • View the infographic
  • Insert charts and graphs into your own presentations (see below)

JPEG Charts and Graphs

The following graphics are available for your use within the greater context of sharing the report. Explanations of each graphic are found within the full report, along with full reference information for the original sources. Note: We ask that you retain the NCWIT copyright and data source information.

Section 1: Girls in IT: What is the current state of affairs?

Section 2: Identifying Barriers: Why the current state of affairs?

Download all charts and graphs (.zip)

Release Date: November 30, 2012

Audience(s): K-12ElementaryMiddle SchoolHigh School

Type(s): Statistics & Reports

Short URL:www.ncwit.org/thefactsgirls

The Importance of Mentorship in STEM educations

In The last months, we’ve been working closely with the U.S. Dept of State in the Techgirls/Girls in tech Mentorship programs initiative. Excited about the partnership and we will be in D.C. July 16th to share more about the mentorship programs with 27 women from eight middle eastern countries and palestinian territories. Ivo Lukas, Chief Innovation Officers & Global exec for mentorship programs will be in Charge of the engagement. To learn more about the initiative, check out the press release here. Join Ivo Lukas in the conversation would be Yahoo, Microsoft, Legacy executives and more. To learn more more, email ivo.lukas@hotmail.com

From June 25 – July 18, these tech-savvy teenagers from Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, the Palestinian Territories, Tunisia, and Yemen will engage with their American counterparts in the classroom and the community, working on their technical development and leadership skills. They will participate in an iD TechCamp, an interactive technology and computer camp, at Towson University; meet with leading U.S. technology companies in Washington, DC, and New York, NY; and take part in community service activities. The TechGirls will be also be mentored by representatives from top technology companies, making important personal contacts and expanding their networks to compete equally in an often male-dominated field.

Working to ensure a diverse experience, the Department has teamed up with several private sector partners, including: 24Notion, ALIVE!, Inc., AT&T, Bully Pulpit Interactive, Code4Charity, the DC Digital Divas Dinner, DoSomething.org, Facebook, George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Girls in Tech, Girls Who Code, Google, OhMyGov Inc., Precision Network, Relief International, TechChange, Women Innovate Mobile, Yahoo!, and Verizon Communications. The State Department is also pleased to collaborate with the White House, Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR), Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-CA), and the Federal Communications Commission for the TechGirls program.

Follow Ivo Lukas @MsSonicFlare