Tag Archives: Mentorship

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Top 10 Ways Managers Can Increase the Visibility of Technical Women

Below are ten important recommendations supervisors or managers can readily adopt to improve visibility of their employees. These recommendations are particularly useful for improving the visibility of women, as well as employees from other underrepresented groups.

  1. Look for key opportunities where employees can increase their visibility

Recommend qualified women for these opportunities, and encourage these women to pursue such opportunities. Also, identify junior women who have the potential for more visible roles and work with them to develop the necessary experience and skills to fill such roles.

  1. Identify and recommend women for top leadership roles

Identifying these women early and actively developing their leadership skills is vital for increasing women’s representation in top leadership over the long term. Doing so also increases overall retention of female technical talent.

  1. Ensure women are visible at strategic corporate events

It is tempting to default to established networks and connections when selecting people for roles at high-profile events, but this can mean overlooking talent from underrepresented groups. Take the time to identify, recommend, and select women for visible roles as speakers, as panelists, in customer briefings, in cross-trainings, or in other roles important to your business.

  1. Give female employees credit for their work

You can make a difference by publicly recognizing female employees for their technical accomplishments. Research shows that women tend to give their team credit whereas men are more likely to take individual credit. In addition, women are often raised to believe that it is arrogant to “sing their own praises.” This belief sometimes means women go unrecognized for important achievements.

  1. Promote female employees’ technical contributions; market their value and technical ability

Not only is it important to give employees credit for their work, it is important to make sure that this work is visible throughout the organization, in the right places and with the right people. This advocacy is an important part of being a sponsor.

  1. Ensure women have a combination of effective mentors and sponsors with organizational clout

Research shows that women with mentors and sponsors (sometimes called advocates) are much more likely to remain with a company than those without. Mentors provide advice or guidance, while sponsors advocate for an employee throughout the company. It is important that sponsors have knowledge of the organization, as well as influence and power.

  1. Look for rotational assignments that will help broaden female employees’ experience, visibility, and influence

Employees must be visible across different parts of the company, as well as knowledgeable about the larger company and its industry picture. Recommend and encourage women to pursue cross-company, rotational assignments that will develop and expand their strengths and talents.

  1. Ensure female employees are focusing on high-value, visible work

Assign women to critical technical roles with high visibility. Keep track of which employees on your team get which roles. Watch for patterns where women are assigned to roles that are less visible or more endangered (e.g., first to be downsized or potential “scapegoat” roles).

  1. Encourage participation in technical conferences and membership in professional organizations

Publicize opportunities for professional development. Provide time and funding for women to attend conferences and professional development sessions.

  1. Help women expand their networks

Use your own network to help women expand their networks, connecting them with influential people across the company and in the industry.

 

The Importance of Mentorship in STEM educations

In The last months, we’ve been working closely with the U.S. Dept of State in the Techgirls/Girls in tech Mentorship programs initiative. Excited about the partnership and we will be in D.C. July 16th to share more about the mentorship programs with 27 women from eight middle eastern countries and palestinian territories. Ivo Lukas, Chief Innovation Officers & Global exec for mentorship programs will be in Charge of the engagement. To learn more about the initiative, check out the press release here. Join Ivo Lukas in the conversation would be Yahoo, Microsoft, Legacy executives and more. To learn more more, email ivo.lukas@hotmail.com

From June 25 – July 18, these tech-savvy teenagers from Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, the Palestinian Territories, Tunisia, and Yemen will engage with their American counterparts in the classroom and the community, working on their technical development and leadership skills. They will participate in an iD TechCamp, an interactive technology and computer camp, at Towson University; meet with leading U.S. technology companies in Washington, DC, and New York, NY; and take part in community service activities. The TechGirls will be also be mentored by representatives from top technology companies, making important personal contacts and expanding their networks to compete equally in an often male-dominated field.

Working to ensure a diverse experience, the Department has teamed up with several private sector partners, including: 24Notion, ALIVE!, Inc., AT&T, Bully Pulpit Interactive, Code4Charity, the DC Digital Divas Dinner, DoSomething.org, Facebook, George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Girls in Tech, Girls Who Code, Google, OhMyGov Inc., Precision Network, Relief International, TechChange, Women Innovate Mobile, Yahoo!, and Verizon Communications. The State Department is also pleased to collaborate with the White House, Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR), Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-CA), and the Federal Communications Commission for the TechGirls program.

Follow Ivo Lukas @MsSonicFlare